Center for Community Futures
P.O. Box 5309
Berkeley, CA 94705


 

Contact Us:

Jim Masters, Director (510) 459-7570, jmasters@cencomfut.com

Matt Klapperich, Office Manager (510) 339-3801, matt@cencomfut.com

Allen Stansbury, Senior Associate (707) 540-5776, allen@stansbury.net

Teresa Wickstrom, Consultant (909) 790-0670, teresa@cencomfut.com

 


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Certificate Program for

Family Development and Case Management Summer Institutes for Head Start Programs

Basic Skills Summer Institute 2017

June 27-30, 2017 at UC Berkeley campus

 

 

Certificate in Family Development for Family Workers in Local Head Start Programs
Based on the PFCE and the Relationship Based Competencies in IM 12-05

The Office of Head Start created the Parent, Family Community Engagement Framework to guide the work of local programs with families.  The OHS published the Relationship Based Competencies (RBC’s) in IM-12-05.  The RBC’s are the knowledge, skills and actions that family workers need to implement the PFCE.

The Center for Community Futures conducts educational programs in family development that provide college credit (up to eighteen hours) or provide Continuing Education Unit’s for MFTs, and LCSWs.  The content of these classes is based on the RBC’s for Head Start family workers so it is directly related to your work. 

The Center has also designed a certification program for family workers based PFCE and the RBC’s in IM-12-05.  The certificate program enables family development workers to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the topic areas covered by the RBC’s.  The four separate classes take  about 100 hours to complete. Each class is described below.  After completing the four courses (12 credit hours) the Certificate in Family Development is automatically issued by the California State University East Bay (CSUEB). 

Most people will complete the four classes for the Certificate over a two-year period.  You take the class in June at UC Berkeley, then do the homework/fieldwork class related to it over the following fall/winter.  Then you take the second class at UC Berkeley in June of the following year, and complete the homework/fieldwork course related to it over the following fall/winter.  Each participant who completes the four classes will receive the certificate from California State University East Bay.  This certificate program includes 12 college credits which are transferable toward an A.A. or B.A. degree.  CSUEB is a fully accredited institution.  More than 600 people have successfully transferred credits from CSUEB to their local college.  Nobody has failed.

The four parts in the certificate program are as follows: 

I.  Basic Skills for Family Workers 1.  Classroom instruction and small-group work.  (About 24 hours of class)  Course # HDEV 7400; 3 credits.  This class provides training on half of the RBC areas.  This class covers the RBC’s related to: culture, engagement, assessment, goal setting, and intervention including interventions in family crisis situations.  (PFCE Goals 1,2,3, and 8)  After each workshop, the participant will take a true/false exam consisting of ten to twenty questions.  All those who have attended the class will have the knowledge needed to pass these exams.  

II. Professional Portfolio: Homework and Fieldwork, Part I.  (About 24 hours on your own)  Course # HDEV 7401; 3 credits. This will be completed back home after the first Classroom session.  You will use your experience to develop answers to 14 questions to demonstrate your competence on the RBC’s covered in the first classroom course.. The homework is based on the information and interventions you learned in the class e.g. culture, engagement, assessment, goal setting, and intervention including interventions in family crisis situations. 

III. Basic Skills for Family Workers 2.  (About 24 hours of class)  Course # HDEV 7402; 3 credits.  This second Summer Institute class provides more skill training.  This class covers the remaining RBC’s.  There are 7 workshops over 32 hours whose primary focus will be on working with families, coordinating and integrating series, family connections to the community, foundations for professional growth and transition from Head Start to Kindergarten,  (PFCE Goals 4, 5,6,7,and 9). 

IV.  Professional Portfolio: Homework and Fieldwork, Part II. Course # HDEV 7403; 3 credits.   (About 24 hours on your own.)  Back home, each individual will answer 18 questions based on what they learned in the class, and will also develop:   
1.  And Autobiography (1 – 2 pages) and

  • Professional Resource File  (A list of the agencies and other resources you use.)  You send us the table of contents of your resource file, not the whole file

After completing these four classes, the candidate will automatically receive the Certificate in Family Development from CSUEB.  Each of these four elements is described in greater detail below.  We bring you social work theory and practice.  The RBC’s from IM-12-05 that are covered in each topic are listed below.  Our curriculum team changed the sequence in which the goals are covered, but they are all covered.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS RELATED TO
THE PFCE and RELATIONSHIP BASED COMPETENCIES
For FAMILY WORKERS IN HEAD START PROGRAMS

  • Basic Skills for Family Workers 1.  

The first four-day course.  CSUEB Course # HDEV 7400
On the campus at UC Berkeley, or in a CSUEB classroom, or at your site.

INTRODUCTION - Overview of Head Start Relationship Based Competencies

PFCE GOAL 2.  SELF AWARE AND CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE RELATIOSHIPS

Instructor (s)

Day 1

Total 6 Hours

  • Knowledge:Identifies and reflects on personal values, experiences, ethics, and biases (e.g. gender, racial, ethnic, cultural, or class) in order to become self-aware and more effective in working with different groups of people.
  • Understands the importance of taking care of oneself in order to be available and capable to attend to the needs of others.

 

Kilolo Brodie, Ph. D.

 

 

  • Skills.  Demonstrates respectful interest in learning about each family’s values, beliefs, faith traditions, cultural influences, family structures, and circumstances.
  • Applies this knowledge to relationship-building and ongoing interactions with each family.
  • Reinforces the importance of home language and culture in a child’s development during interactions with parents and expectant families.

 

 

 

 

Actions.

  • Conducts culturally and linguistically responsive outreach and recruitment to parents and expectant families.
  • Provides intake and orientation materials to families that are culturally and linguistically appropriate

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 8.  DATA DRIVEN SERVICES AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

Instructor (s)

Day 1

2 hours

Knowledge: 

  • Understands how the Head Start Program Performance Standards, the Head Start Act, and Office of Head Start family engagement and family services technical assistance resources relate to daily work.
  • Learns to use different program data sources to inform work with parents and expectant families.*

James I. Masters, M.S.  Center for Community Futures

 

 

Skills: 

  • Knows how to use family well-being data to inform decisions and methods for supporting families.
  • Integrates data collected from parents and expectant families into individualized services, decision-making, and daily practice (e.g. survey, observational, or conversational data that includes family ideas and experiences).

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Performs effective recordkeeping and internal and external reporting tasks to track individual family progress and program progress.
  • Prepares and distributes evaluations and feedback suggestion forms during workshops, meetings, and other activities for parents and families.
  • Uses data results to inform the design of workshops, meetings, and other activities for parents and expectant families.

 

 

 

 

Note. 
The faculty members listed are the usual faculty for each class but substitutions may take place depending on their availability on any given date. 

PFCE GOAL 1.  POSITIVE GOAL ORIENTED RELATIONSHIPS:  Part 1 Overview of Case Management and Engagement. 

Instructor (s)

Day 2

Total 4 Hours

Knowledge.

  • Develops knowledge of effective relationship-building practices.
  • Understands that parents/expectant parents and staff each bring equal value to the relationship.

Cathy Ralph, LCSW

 

 

Skills:

  • Helps families feel welcomed, safe, and respected by building trusting relationships over time.
  • Shows respect for different families’ circumstances and creates opportunities for families to consider their aspirations for their children and themselves.
  • Uses appropriate communication techniques, such as verbal and nonverbal messages and reflective listening.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Makes contact with both mothers and fathers to develop ongoing relationships.

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 1.  POSITIVE GOAL ORIENTED RELATIONSHIPS:  Part 2 Assessment and Goal Setting  

Instructor (s)

Day 2

4 hours

Skills: 

  • Demonstrates the ability to work with families on different kinds of goals (health, nutrition, parent/child interactions, mental health, family literacy, financial literacy, etc.).
  • Demonstrates the ability to jointly develop and follow up on goals that are meaningful for families and individualizes services for parents and expectant mothers and fathers.
  • Makes ethical decisions that maintain professional boundaries and family confidentiality.

Cathy Ralph, LCSW

 

 

Actions:

  • In partnership with families, develops and supports plans that describe families’  strengths, resources, and needed services.

 

 

 

 


 

PFCE GOAL 3.  FAMILY WELL BEING AND FAMILIES AS LEARNERS.  Part 1, Mental Health

Instructor (s)

Day 3

4 Hours

Knowledge: 

  • Develops knowledge and awareness of the signs of depression, trauma, homelessness, domestic violence, and/or mental illness for parents and expectant families.

Rebecca Wixon, MSW

 

 

Skills:

  • Can increase families’ awareness and ability to identify protective factors/strengths they have to overcome challenges.
  • Can increase families’ awareness and ability to address the risks and stressors in their lives.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Connects families with opportunities that support safety, financial literacy, health, and family wellness.

 

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 3.  FAMILY WELL BEING AND FAMILIES AS LEARNERS.  Part 2.  Crisis Intervention

Instructor (s)

Day 3

 4 hours

Knowledge: 

  • Understands the proper steps to ensure family and child safety, when safety is threatened.

Rebecca Wixon, MSW

 

 

Skills:

  • Is able to conduct educational opportunities for parents and expectant families on the importance of healthy relationships and support networks.
  • Knows how to identify, in partnership with the family, options and resources to address challenges and work toward aspirations and long-term family stability.

 

 

 

Actions: 

  • Connects families with opportunities that support safety, financial literacy, health, and family wellness.
  • Links parents to training that contributes to self-sufficiency and reaching goals around their education and/or career training.

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 3.  FAMILY WELL BEING AND FAMILIES AS LEARNERS.  Part 3.  Parent Education and Networking

Instructor (s)

Day 4

4 hours

The RBC;s are the same as the previous workshop, with the emphasis on parent education and networking. 

Jenell Thompson, M.Ed, LCSW

 

 

Passing a true-false quiz at the end of each and every workshop based on the information presented in the workshop ensures that each participant is meeting core competency requirements. 

Either during the class or after the class, students who want college credit may select either a pass/fail option or a letter-grade option.  About 90%choose the letter-grade option.  So far, of the 800 Head Start Family workers who have completed these classes, the only students who chose the pass-fail option were students whose first language was not English.

II.  Professional Portfolio.  Homework and Field Work Part I. (About 24 hours) Course # HDEV 7401 (3 credits).   After the first Institute, the candidate will complete 14 statements of competence.  These statements are written by the family worker in her or his own words for each of the topics listed below.  Each of the 14 statements of competence is developed through self-study and fieldwork.  The questions ask how you used or applied the knowledge that you learned in the classroom course in your work with families.  These are descriptions of what you do.  Here are the questions.  Most answers are be ½ page to two pages in length

PFCE 2 Self Aware and Culturally Responsive Relationships

  • Describe the philosophy of YOUR HEAD START program and the services it provides.
  • Describe 4 activities (2 internal and 2 external) in which you have worked with other program staff.
  • Describe 3 ways served as a productive team member in your agency.
  • Obtain statement from supervisor that you are performing recording keeping and reporting tasks correctly and in a timely manner.
  • Describe your participation in strategic planning, program self-assessment or another effort to improve program services.
  • Describe your agency’s outreach and recruitment programs, and enrollment procedures.  Be sure to describe your part in these.
  • Describe your work with a family of a culture different than your own. Be specific about HOW you learned and WHAT your learned about the family’s values, beliefs,   traditions, cultural influences, make-up and circumstances.  Be specific and give examples about how you used your knowledge of and sensitivity to their culture as you interacted with them for purposes of engagement, assessment, or goal setting.  (If you ONLY do enrollment, describe that.  If you do more than enrollment, then go beyond enrollment.) 

 

PFCE 3  Family Well-Being and Families as Learners

  • Describe at least 3 examples about how you have provided or coordinated training and/or educational opportunities for parents on one or more the these topics:  the importance of healthy relationships and support networks; or contributes to self sufficiency, or reaches goals around education or career training. 
  • Describe how you have helped parents connect with each of the following: opportunities that support safety, financial literacy, health and family wellness.
  • Describe 3 methods you have used to promote and support parent involvement and leadership throughout the program.
  • Describe a family situation in which you applied your knowledge of mental health to ensure holistic service delivery.  List 3 specific pieces of information you used to help the family.
  • Describe your work with a family in crisis.   Include descriptions of the following:
    * Your assessment of the situation;
    * The steps you took to ensure the safety of all involved;
    * The factors you considered when deciding to intervene or to refer to others;
    * The options and resources available to address the crisis, and the consequences of  their use.
    * 3 ways in which you supported the family in making decisions and taking active steps to resolve the current crisis and to be prepared to address future crises.
     

PFCE 1  Positive Goal Oriented Relationships

  • Describe the engagement process with a family with whom you have worked.  You may want to refer to course material on the 16 steps of engagement (although it is not necessary to comment on each one).  How did you help this specific family feel welcome, safe and respected by building trust. 
  • Write an assessment for this same family using the assessment guide provided in the workshop.  If your agency uses a specific assessment tool like a genogram or ecomap, please include a copy of it.
  • Using the Family Partnership Plan or Agreement, describe an intervention plan with this same family.  Write down the goal(s) they have decided to achieve.  Describe how at least one of these goals satisfy the SMART criteria, (Simple, Measurable, Achievable, Reasonable, Timely.) 

 

 


II. Basic Skills for Family Workers 2

The second 4-day program.  CSUEB Course # HDEV 7402
On the campus at UC Berkeley, or in a CSUEB classroom, or at your site.

 

PFCE GOAL 4.  PARENT CHILD RELATIONSHIPS AND FAMILIES AND LIFELONG EDUCATORS

Instructor (s)

Day 1

8 Hours

Knowledge:

  • Understands that families are vital to children’s development and learning.
  • Recognizes positive interactions between families and children.

Jenell Thompson.
M.Ed, LCSW

 

 

Skills:

  • Actively engages families in interactions with their children when children are present.
  • Is able to focus on family and child strengths as an entry point into relationships and conversations about children.
  • Promotes prenatal attachment with expectant families.
  • Facilitates and/or coordinates evidenced-based parenting education opportunities for parents individually and in groups, individualizing for culture, gender, and age, as appropriate.
  • Supports parents (or links parents to supports) to address challenging child behaviors in positive, developmentally appropriate ways and accesses resources as necessary.
  • Works well with other program staff to support ongoing interactive literacy activities between parents and their children at home and in the community.
  • Supports families in developing skills and confidence to be effective leaders and advocates for their children.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Talks with families about their vital role in their children’s development and learning.
  • Supports expectant families in making connections between their actions and the pre-natal effects.
  • Offers learning materials for children and parents that reflect families’ cultures, and encourages family members to visit, observe, and volunteer in the program.
  • Provides families with appropriate information, training, and connections to future early care and educational settings and kindergarten to help facilitate the transition process for parents and children.
  • Develops strong relationships with community child care, preschools, and public schools in order to enhance home-school partnerships and transitions.

 

 

 


 

PFCE GOAL 7.  COORDINATED, INTEGRATED AND COMPREHENSIVE SERVICES

Instructor (s)

Day 2

4 Hours

Knowledge:

  • Develops a basic knowledge of health, mental health, child development, and disabilities to ensure service coordination amongst Head Start/Early Head Start staff.

Christine Slaymaker, Sonoma County Head Start

 

 

Skills: 

  • Is able to work cooperatively with other staff (mental health, teaching, health, disabilities, etc.) to ensure families’ individual values and practices are incorporated into program strategies for children and families.
  • Can communicate with families and others about the importance of health, mental health, and child development services for children’s ongoing learning and development.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Ensures that pertinent knowledge about families is appropriately shared with colleagues and professionals in a way that assures confidentiality and increases service coordination.

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 5.  FAMILY CONNECTIONS TO PEERS AND COMMUNITY

Instructor (s)

Day 2

4 Hours

Knowledge:

  • Recognizes the importance of support networks, particularly for isolated families.
  • Understands how facilitation skills support group processes and interactions

Christine Slaymaker, Sonoma County Head Start

 

 

Skills:

  • Demonstrates group facilitation knowledge and skills.
  • Is able to support families in identifying, developing, and utilizing their informal and formal support networks (e.g. neighborhood groups, faith/spiritual communities, civic organizations).
  • Has the ability to identify common interests and needs of parents in order to plan appropriate activities and learning opportunities.
  • Is skilled at coordinating training and educational opportunities for parents (e.g. adult education, life skills, parenting courses, family literacy, employment training).

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Educates parents on Policy Council and other available committee or community opportunities that will promote parent leadership and advocacy.
  • Includes parents as active participants in groups and training so they can share skills, culture, and talents.

Supports parents as they engage in volunteering, collaborating with the community, and other ways of contributing to program activities and the larger community.

 

 

 

 

 

PFCE GOAL 6.  FAMIY ACCESS TO COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Instructor (s)

Day 3

8 Hours

Knowledge:

  • Has an extensive knowledge of social service and community resources for families (e.g. health, mental health, nutrition, financial literacy, education).
  • Understands how to match community and program resources to family interests and needs.
  • Knows when and how to connect families with specialized resources and assistance (e.g. mental health, domestic violence, substance abuse treatment, child welfare services) and when to ask for supervisory help to do so.

Christine Slaymaker, Sonoma County Head Start

 

 

Skills:

  • Knows how to provide ongoing information and support to families in using program services and community resources to achieve family goals and promote the well-being of children.
  • Demonstrates the ability to support families as leaders in the program and as advocates for needed resources for their families.
  • Is able to build partnerships with schools and service providers to link families to needed services and support successful transitions.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Becomes family’s liaison to program and community services as appropriate. This could include joint visits with professionals in health, mental health, child development, and child welfare as indicated to address specific issues or family needs.
  • Follows up on the effectiveness of family referrals to community resources.

 

 

 


 

PFCE GOAL 9. FOUNDATIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

Instructor (s)

Day 4

4 Hours

Knowledge:

  • Understands what professionalism requires in a human services environment.
  • Understands the value of reflective supervision for personal and professional growth.

Shawneece Stevenson, MSW

 

 

Skills:

  • Demonstrates the ability to be self-reflective and integrate new knowledge into practice.
  • Maintains professional boundaries and confidentiality of family and child information.
  • Effectively utilizes supervisory feedback, educational opportunities, and technical assistance resources to improve individual skills and knowledge.

 

 

 

Actions:

  • Actively engages in reflective supervision to gain new insights and knowledge about relationships with families.
  • Creates and works on individualized professional development plans in collaboration with supervisors.

 

 

 

 

THE CENTER CONDUCTS BOTH SUMMER INSTITUTES -- Basic Skills 1 and Basic Skills 2 – each year.

You may take either “1” or “2” first. 

“1” is not a prerequisite for “2”

We have simply divided the Relationship Based Competencies in IM-12-05 into two groups.  It does not make any difference which class you take first. 


IV.  Professional Portfolio: Homework and Fieldwork, Part II.  (About 40 hours on homework, about 8 hours on the autobiography and resource file.)  CSUEB Course # HDEV 7403.   After the second class, the candidate will complete an additional 18 statements of competence, written by the family worker in her or his own words, one for each of the topics listed below.  Each of the 18 statements of competence is developed through self-study and fieldwork.  Here are the 18 questions or topics for statements.

PFCE GOAL 4.  Parent Child Relationships and Families as Lifelong Educators

  • Describe 3 ways in which you provided training for parents in how to be the primary teacher for their children and full partners in the education of their children.
  • Describe 3 ways in which you assisted parents as adult learners to recognize and address their own literacy goals.
  • Describe 3 ways you have supported parents in engaging in literacy training.

 

PFCE 7  Coordinated, Integrated and Comprehensive Services

  • Describe a family situation in which you applied your knowledge of health or mental health to ensure holistic service delivery.  List 3 specific pieces of information you used to help the family.
  • Describe a family situation in which you applied your knowledge of disabilities to ensure holistic service delivery.  List 3 specific pieces of information you used to help the family.
  • Describe a family situation in which you applied your knowledge of child development to ensure holistic service delivery.  List 3 specific pieces of information you used to help the family.

PFCE 5  Family Connections to Peers and Community

  • Describe a parent group at your site. 
  • Explain how the group was formed, how participants were recruited and how long they’ve been meeting.  Next, describe group dynamics or interactions among the participants and facilitator(s).
  • Tell something about parent leadership emergence and development.
  • Describe your role or participation in this group.
  •  Explain how you helped a specific family to develop connections to peers and community through an approach other than a parent group at your site.

PFCE 6 Family Access to Community Resources

  • Describe 3 methods you used to identify needs and potential community resources that you used after learning about a family during a home visit.
  • Describe 3 ways you advocated for a family -- and 3 ways you supported them to advocate for themselves within their community.
  • Describe from beginning to end a case conference/meeting you facilitated with members of the community and the family to promote service integration.

PFCE 9  Foundations for Professional Growth

  • Describe 3 ways in which you have utilized the knowledge and skills of your supervisors to develop professionally.
  • Describe in one thousand (1000) or fewer words your use of family support principles, theories, practices, and code of ethics in specific situations with families.
  • Describe 3 ways in which you have utilized technical assistance resources (consultation with another agency or a consultant or a faculty member in a class you were taking) to improve your competence. 
  • Describe 3 decisions you have made based on your knowledge of family support principles, theories, practices, and/or the code of ethics.  The decisions you describe should have contributed to your professional development.
  • Define the term “professional boundaries.”  Describe a family situation in which your professional boundaries were challenged.  Describe your decision-making process and action(s) and justify your action(s).
  • Describe your agency’s policy regarding confidentiality.  List at least five exceptions to the general rules of confidentiality.
  •  Write a plan for termination and/or transition of services for a family.  This can be an actual family you worked with or a made-up example.

After the second Institute, the participant will also prepare an Autobiography of no more than 750 words.  It will articulate an awareness of self and ethics as they impact on work with families, and identify and reflect on personal values, experiences, and biases that facilitate and/or present barriers in working with persons different from herself/himself.

After the second classroom Institute, the participant will also prepare a Resource File that will be used by the participant during her/his career in family development.  It provides information candidates find valuable in their work and contains reference material about other agencies or about family development that will be used daily. The creation of the file provides candidates with an important experience in locating resources and articulating their own view of their work in Head Start. 

Material can be arranged in any one of many creative ways (e.g. bound in a notebook, or put in folders in a file box, or entered as a database in a computer).  It should be professional looking, manageable in size and legible. It should be easy to add, delete or update information. It should be portable; i.e., it can be carried to-and-from a work site, to a home visit or to a meeting.

The Resource File may include, for example:
Directories used for referral and placement.
Memoranda of Understanding with other agencies  
Descriptions of other agencies’ services and eligibility requirements.
Blank application forms, data entry-tools.
Lists of web-sites, e-mail addresses and phone numbers.

PLEASE SEND US ONLY THE TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR YOUR RESOURCE FILE AND NOT THE RESOURCE FILE ITSELF.

After completing these four courses, the candidate will automatically receive the Certificate in Family Development from the Department of Human Development at the California State University East Bay.

Completion of the requirements for this certificate also includes 12 college credit hours (3 credits for each of the four elements) from CSUEB, which is a fully accredited institution.  Transfer these for use in an A.A. or a B.A. program, and  with permission of your faculty advisor, for use in a Graduate program.

We will give you the instructions on how to transfer the credits. 

Pricing for Certificate in Family Development:   However, the California State University credit fee is $89 per credit hour, or $267 for 3 credits, and it may be increased again at any time.

Class Name  
HDEV 7400-HA  Family Worker Classroom Training 

 

  Tuition/Books/Room & Board (based on double occupancy) $A/Q
  Tuition and books – no housing provided. $645
  3 credits Cal State East Bay Fee is $267
     
HDEV 7401-HA Field Work 1 at work site  
  Supervision Fee $295
  3 credits Cal State East Bay Fee is $267
     
HDEV 7402-HA Family Worker Classroom Training 2  
  Tuition/Books/Room & Board (based on double occupancy) $A/Q
  Tuition and books – no housing provided. $645
  3 credits Cal State East Bay Fee is  $267
     

HDEV 7403-HA Field Work 2 at work site
 
  Supervision Fee  $295
  3 credits Cal State East Bay Fee is $267

Make checks for Tuition/Books/Room Board and Supervision fees payable to:
Center for Community Futures    EIN 68-0177602

Make the $267 checks for Cal State East Bay college credit fees payable to:
CSUEB (California State University of the East Bay). 
You must do a separate check for each class you take from CSUEB.  You must give Jim Masters the reg form and checks because the forms and checks for the entire class must all be sent to Cal State as one package.

If the session is at the Holiday Inn Fisherman’s Wharf or the Cal State University downtown classrooms in Oakland, then housing/meals are not provided.  Website: www.cencomfut.com

Mailing address:
Jim Masters
Center for Community Futures
PO Box 5309
Berkeley, CA  94705

E-mail jmasters@cencomfut.com
For credit card payments or for other questions call Jim at 510.459.7570

 

 
Center for Community Futures. www.cencomfut.com 
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